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Lucas Lee
Lucas Lee

Where To Buy Surplus Rifles


CMP has sent me three beautiful rifles. I kindly requested WWII receivers and you all sent me exactly what I wanted, well, actually way better than I expected. You all have simply been amazing with your ordering/costumer service.




where to buy surplus rifles


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The CMP does not issue or loan rifles to the law enforcement, veterans organizations, or other honor guards. That support is provided by the Depart of the Army Ceremonial Rifle Program. Please see for more information.


Although you can send all of this in advance of a mail order, we recommend that you wait and attach everything to the first order that you mail to us. In the case of a rifle order where you have to send all the paperwork anyway then providing all the qualifying documentation in advance only saves a couple of minutes in processing time once we actually do get your order.


The CMP occasionally also conducts other special sales programs as assets become available. Any purchases of M1 Garand functioning rifles, M1 Garand Drill Rifles, M1 Garand Ceremonial Rifles, M1 Garand receivers, from any CMP sales outlet (including the CMP Auction) will count against the 8 M1 Garand limit per calendar year.


During the past 14 years, the Army has required most units and schools to turn in all of their smallbore rifles. Except for a very few stragglers, all of the smallbore rifles were returned to Army storage. These returns, plus all the other smallbore rifles already in depot storage were then transferred to the CMP. Most of these have already been sold over the past 14 years and very few remain in CMP inventory. A trickle of a few dozen of these rifles does find its way to the CMP annually, but we do not expect to ever again receive large quantities of US government smallbore training or target rifles, since they no longer exist in Army inventory (depot or loan).


There are approximately 900 Remington 40X (standard and heavy barrel combined) that we will be inspecting, repairing and offering for sale in a few months. At this time we cannot predict how many will pass inspection as complete rifles and how many will be just barreled receivers. Until we complete inspecting each and every one of these rifles and know what we have, we will not be able to set prices or take orders (or pre-orders) or establish a waiting list.


We also have approximately 300 H&R M12, 500 Remington 513T, and 500 Winchester 52 series rifles. These rifles still have to be inspected, repaired if possible, and graded before we can put them up for sale. As with the 40X above, we cannot predict how many will pass inspection as complete rifles and how many will be just barreled receivers. Until we complete inspecting each and every one of these rifles and know what we have, we will not be able to set prices or take orders (or pre-orders) or establish a waiting list. We do not have a timeline for working these models, but do expect to get at least one model worked in 2011, in addition to the 40X.


In addition to the above models, we do have approximately 1,200 Kimber Model 82 rifles still available. These are available for purchase now. We expect them to sell out in the next 12-18 months, based on sales history.


Over the past ten years the Army has transferred to the CMP all depot stocks of Krags, M1917s, M1903, and M1903A3 rifles. In addition, a large quantity of M1903s were returned from overseas and also transferred to the CMP. There are no longer any of these model rifles on loan overseas or in Army inventory, other than what they reserved for museum use. For the past few years, the only source of these rifles was/is from veterans organizations (VFW, AL, AMVETS, MCL, etc) as they either shut their chapters or as they upgrade the worn out rifles to M1 Garands.


For all practical purposes, the CMP sold out of these rifles in 2011, basically ending CMP sales of surplus bolt action rifles. A trickle of a few dozen of these rifles does find its way to the CMP annually which are offered on the CMP Auction Site.


This selection of guns includes pistols and revolvers, as well as rifles, from names like Auto-Ordnance, Browning, Carl Gustav, Century Arms, Colt, Chinese State Factories, FN, Mauser, Russian State Factories, Springfield Armory, and more.


The primary source of CMP's revenues from fiscal years 2008 through 2017 was from the sale of surplus rifles, which, according to CMP's internal financial documents, generated $196.8 million in revenue. CMP also sold commercial ammunition and memorabilia, which, according to the same documents, generated $76.4 million in revenue. Further, according to its Internal Revenue Service filings for this time frame, CMP reported earning $49.8 million in interest and dividends from its investment account. CMP began selling surplus M1911 handguns in November 2018 and had just begun generating revenue from these sales at the time of GAO's review. The profit that CMP realized from the sales of surplus rifles could not be determined because CMP's methodology to calculate expenses did not account for all of CMP's costs associated with the sale of these rifles. GAO estimates future sales of CMP's surplus handgun and rifles currently available for sale could generate as much as $104.9 million, or enough to fund CMP's operations for several years. Further, as of September 30, 2017, CMP reported having cash of $3.6 million, and an investment account valued at $188.6 million. This could also allow CMP to continue operations for several years.


Since 1996, the Army has transferred more than 700,000 surplus rifles and handguns to CMP. The National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 1996 authorized CMP to sell certain types of surplus Army firearms to U.S. citizens, including M1 .30 caliber rifles. CMP reimburses the Army for the costs to prepare and transport surplus firearms to CMP.


The Civilian Marksmanship Program is well known as the go-to place to buy surplus military firearms, so the Government Accountability Office recently tallied up how much money the nonprofit has generated from selling tens of thousands of M1 Garand rifles over the past decade.


Looking backward nine years from 2017, the GAO reports that the government-chartered CMP has brought in $323 million in revenue. About 61 percent of those earnings comes from selling M1 rifles, many of which were used in World War II and the Korean War.


"The primary source of CMP's revenues from fiscal years 2008 through 2017 was from the sale of surplus rifles, which, according to CMP's internal financial documents, generated $196.8 million in revenue," according to the GAO.


The National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for fiscal 1996 authorized the CMP to sell certain types of surplus Army firearms to U.S. citizens, including M1 .30 caliber rifles. The program reimburses the Army for the costs to prepare and transport surplus firearms to the CMP, according to the GAO report.


"The profit that CMP realized from the sales of surplus rifles could not be determined because CMP's methodology to calculate expenses did not account for all of CMP's costs associated with the sale of these rifles," it added.


Upon entering the dingy building we climbed a flight of stairs and entered a cavernous room in which stood rack upon rack of grease encrusted rifles: Mausers, Lee-Enfields, Mosin-Nagants, Arisakas, Carcanos, Mannlichers - you name it, they were all represented in this dimly lit loft.


With the lifting of the ban on the importation of military surplus guns that had been imposed by the Gun Control Act of 1966, large numbers of relatively inexpensive military surplus rifles are once again available on the U.S. market. And while rifles imported during this "Second Golden Age" of military surplus guns, would-be collectors should understand that there are several big differences between it and the first.


First of all, these rifles are now an additional forty-something years older. While some of them remained in service during that period, the vast majority remained in storage under conditions ranging from excellent to abysmal.


If they don't, you should assume the rifle was assembled from parts after it left storage and thus the headspace may be off enough as to make firing dangerous. Such rifles are fine for display but should not be fired unless they are checked over first by a competent gunsmith.


Damaged muzzles will effect accuracy adversely and, unless small enough to be removed without damaging the collectible value of the rifle, those rifles with them should be avoided if you are looking for a shooter. Bore condition may or may not affect shootability. I have a number of shootable military surplus guns in my collection whose bores display a fair amount of wear.


But some military surplus gun dealers will attempt the same repairs, usually attempting to cover their crude efforts up with wood filler. Also avoid rifles whose stocks have been excessively sanded or scraped to remove dents, dings, grease and finish. This is usually indicated by the wood being humped up around, stock fitting, metal fixtures and other protuberances. Not only does this destroy interesting markings (some of which might increase the collector's value of your rifle) but it can cause structural weakness to the stock itself.


Be certain that you are firing the correct ammunition in your rifle. There are any number of cartridges that can be chambered in rifles not intended for them. Once you have determined the correct cartridge for your rifle, use nothing but original surplus or - if available - new commercial ammunition for shooting.


Since June, the state Central Services Department has received about 640 requests for surplus weapons. Most of the requests are for military-style assault rifles, said Oran Redden, property reutilization division administrator.


Except for highly collectible, extremely rare and incredibly expensive items, such as authentic German WWII Third Reich pieces or Civil War swords and similar, generally surplus gear is extremely affordable, absolutely functional and durable. Highly collectible items are extremely difficult to find and come with a hefty price tag, and in some countries, they are illegal to own. For example, anything a fallen leader owned or touched commands a high price and high demand in certain circles. I found one Civil War sword listed for nearly $10,000. In addition to serious collectors, military surplus gear is popular with hunters, campers and preppers. We also recently have seen a resurgence in interest in military surplus guns. Especially gaining in popularity is the Mosin Nagant. When I bought mine, you could still find them for about $80. Due to popularity and demand, prices have risen. Historically, military surplus rifles are easy to find, affordable and cheap to feed, plus many people find them a joy to shoot. 041b061a72


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