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Julian Mironov
Julian Mironov

Buying An Old House Inspection



One of the most prevalent old house problems is the condition of the roof. While different types of shingles have diverse lifespans, it really depends on the weather, maintenance record, installation quality and roof grade.




buying an old house inspection


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Many older homes built before 1978 contain both lead-based paint and asbestos. Before buying or moving into a home built in this time, make sure to have it checked for both of these hazardous materials since neither can be seen by the naked eye.


Another issue that comes with buying an older home is that old trees may have roots growing into the plumbing system underground, which could get costly (and messy). Make sure to have your home inspector or a certified plumber inspect the piping.


Part of the charm of your old house may be the gorgeous old windows, but come wintertime, you might be having second thoughts. Before you rush to tear out the historic windows your house came with, you also have the option to keep the notable charm by weatherstripping and adding storm windows to increase energy efficiency.


Mechanical systems such as the furnace (or boiler), air-conditioning unit and water heaters are important pieces that keep your household going. To avoid the heat going out or a sudden cold shower in the middle of winter, make sure to check when each appliance was purchased and its average lifespan to help decide when to replace them.


These aesthetic issues are typically fixable with a decent budget and reliable contractor. If you decide to buy the home, you can plan to tackle one room at a time, while making sure to prioritize anything that could be unsafe, such as a partially finished deck. Plus, fixing up an old house and making it your own can be fun and add resale value.


Even if your old home has many of these problems cited in its inspection, that should not scare you away. If the price is right, and depending on your budget, you should be able to make the repairs and renovations necessary to turn it into your dream home.


If the inspector reveals significant concerns or necessary repairs, you may renegotiate the purchase price, request the seller make the repairs, or dissolve the contract. Remember, a home inspection is designed to protect you and ensure you understand any potential safety risks of a home before you buy.


A couple other things to look at would be the septic system, they are out of sight out of mind but still need maintenance, and if there was anything done to the house in the 1960s and 70s you likely have asbestos.


Why daughter is in the process of buying a 90 year old home in Columbus, Ohio (German Village). We found old knob and tube wiring in the basement and attic, but the inspector said they were not energized. He could not guarantee there was not more behind the walls. Need to have an electrician look at the electrical panel to verify nomex wiring coming out and VERIFY your insurance is ok for coverage. Also, termites inspection.


Wow! You are very detailed William. Thank you for this write. Very informative and very experiential. I am a newbie in real estate and I am considering a house built in 1973. I drove past the house, it looks nice on the outside. But will pay attention to all these things you mentioned. What do you think I should pay attention to for a house built in 1973? Thank you again, your experience and the comments of other make me think even deeper about this.


Whew! I know that was a lot of information. But please note, this house inspection checklist is not exhaustive! But I hope it gives you some tangible examples of where you might incur additional costs, such as with maintenance or long-term renovation projects.


Old houses will likely contain either asbestos, lead paint, or both unless the property has been previously remediated.Lead-based Paint ProblemsLead is a neurotoxic metal harmful to people, particularly young children. Lead paint was used in interior and exterior paint before 1978. Lead was also used in plumbing pipes until the mid-1980s. Ingestion of lead through the mouth or nose could lead to heavy metal poisoning.The EPA banned the use of lead in paint because of the potential for children to chew on furniture and toys containing lead. Adults are vulnerable to lead through the risk of sanding wall surfaces with lead paint and breathing in the dust particles.


Other cost factors include the height of the roof from the ground and your local market. Many 2 and 3 stories older houses have steep roof pitches that require specialized equipment to do the replacement. Not every roofing contractor can replace a roof on an old house. If a roofing contractor has to come from out of town, this will increase costs.Mechanical Equipment ProblemsMany older homes routinely have old heating and cooling systems and water heaters.Heating and cooling systems have an average lifespan of 20-25 years. Many heating and cooling systems last less than 10-15 years in coastal climates. Annual maintenance is important to get the most out of a heating and cooling system.Some older heating and cooling systems may still be functional; however, you can expect high maintenance costs and the risk of sudden breakdown. The problem with older systems is parts may be challenging to come by.Old HVAC ductwork can cause a system to overwork and wear out faster. Old ductwork is generally prone to air leaks, which lead to higher energy costs and potential problems from condensation, mold, and mildew around leaking joints in the ductwork.


As the galvanized piping corrodes, rust and other contaminants get absorbed into the water, causing rust on tubs, sinks, toilets, and other fixtures. This can also shorten the lifespan of your water heater. Lastly, contaminated water from galvanized piping can cause heavy metal poisoning when consumed over a long period.Polybutylene PipingOther dangerous piping includes polybutylene (PB) piping. Polybutylene piping is grayish piping used from the 1970s to the 1990s. Polybutylene piping corrodes over time in contact with chlorine found in municipal water supply and many household cleaners.Polybutylene is a defective product that has been a part of a class-action lawsuit with the manufacturer. Polybutylene piping has been known to fail without warning. For more information on polybutylene piping failures, see Inspectpedia.comCast Iron PipingWaste piping, such as old steel and cast iron piping, is also prone to failure due to age. While cast iron is a good quality material for drainage, it is difficult to work with and expensive to repair.Cast iron pipes are often only replaced when a failure occurs. Most plumbers will simply remove the old pieces of cast iron pipe and replace them with PVC piping.


After a home inspection, you can ask your broker to negotiate any necessary repairs with the sellers or ask the sellers to lower the price so you can fix the problems yourself. Getting quotes from local contractors will help you write out a counter offer based on estimates, but a buyer should be aware that a seller is not obligated to fix anything."}},"@type": "Question","name": "What Should You Ask During a Home Inspection?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "During the inspection, ask the inspector what they will inspect and what isn't covered in the inspection. Ask them about anything you are worried about, like a sagging roof, poor electrical, or rusty or slow-flowing water out of the taps. Don't be afraid of asking questions during the inspection such as, "is this a big problem or a little problem?" and if they can explain any functions of the home you might not be familiar with, like a fireplace or an oil burner.","@type": "Question","name": "How Long After a Home Inspection Does a Buyer Have to Back Out?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "Many home inspection contingencies are based on a seven-day timetable. This means that after you sign the purchase agreement and the inspection occurs, you have seven days to back out.","@type": "Question","name": "How Should You Prepare Your Home for a Home Inspection?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "Make sure there is easy access to the property, from clearing out the entrance to your basement to clearing out any clutter. Take a good look at your roof, are there shingles falling off? If so, it might be time to fix them. Make sure all taps and toilets work. Then check that all the light bulbs are working in both exterior and interior lights.Fuse boxes should be easily identifiable, take care of leaks and water damage, and if you have a pest or bug infestation, bring a professional in to take care of it before the inspection occurs.","@type": "Question","name": "How Much Does a Mold Inspection Cost on a Home?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "The cost of a mold inspection can cost up to $1000 or as little as $295. It will depend on a few factors, including the inspector doing the job, and the size and location of the home."]}]}] Investing Stocks Bonds Fixed Income Mutual Funds ETFs Options 401(k) Roth IRA Fundamental Analysis Technical Analysis Markets View All Simulator Login / Portfolio Trade Research My Games Leaderboard Economy Government Policy Monetary Policy Fiscal Policy View All Personal Finance Financial Literacy Retirement Budgeting Saving Taxes Home Ownership View All News Markets Companies Earnings Economy Crypto Personal Finance Government View All Reviews Best Online Brokers Best Life Insurance Companies Best CD Rates Best Savings Accounts Best Personal Loans Best Credit Repair Companies Best Mortgage Rates Best Auto Loan Rates Best Credit Cards View All Academy Investing for Beginners Trading for Beginners Become a Day Trader Technical Analysis All Investing Courses All Trading Courses View All TradeSearchSearchPlease fill out this field.SearchSearchPlease fill out this field.InvestingInvesting Stocks Bonds Fixed Income Mutual Funds ETFs Options 401(k) Roth IRA Fundamental Analysis Technical Analysis Markets View All SimulatorSimulator Login / Portfolio Trade Research My Games Leaderboard EconomyEconomy Government Policy Monetary Policy Fiscal Policy View All Personal FinancePersonal Finance Financial Literacy Retirement Budgeting Saving Taxes Home Ownership View All NewsNews Markets Companies Earnings Economy Crypto Personal Finance Government View All ReviewsReviews Best Online Brokers Best Life Insurance Companies Best CD Rates Best Savings Accounts Best Personal Loans Best Credit Repair Companies Best Mortgage Rates Best Auto Loan Rates Best Credit Cards View All AcademyAcademy Investing for Beginners Trading for Beginners Become a Day Trader Technical Analysis All Investing Courses All Trading Courses View All Financial Terms Newsletter About Us Follow Us Facebook Instagram LinkedIn TikTok Twitter YouTube Table of ContentsExpandTable of ContentsThe Home Inspection ContingencyWhat a Home Inspection CoversExterior InspectionInterior InspectionNot Covered in a Home InspectionAfter the InspectionHome Inspections: Worth the Investment?Frequently Asked QuestionsFAQsThe Bottom LineMortgageBuying a HomeWhat Is a Home Inspection Contingency and Why Is It Important? By 041b061a72


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